The reduction, reuse and recycling of construction and demolition materials is an important part of reducing waste in Deschutes County. The EPA estimates the total building related construction and demolition (C&D) waste to be over 135 million tons per year, and the average new construction project creates 3.9 pounds of waste per square foot. Here in Deschutes County, we see a lot of C&D waste enter Knott Landfill each year, with more waste being produced as the building industry has picked up again in recent years.

Most building and construction waste is actually created in the demolition and destruction process. With a little time and proper planning, many of these materials can be reused or recycled, rather than sending them to the landfill.

Deconstructing and reclaiming materials saves resources by keep materials “in the loop”. Deconstruction refers to the systematic disassembly of a building with the purpose of recovering its materials for reuse, renovation or new product use. Reclamation involves the stripping of usable building materials for the purpose of reuse without affecting the structural elements or integrity of the building.

The Bend Area and Redmond Habitat for Humanity affiliates both reclaim building materials for no charge.  Several Habitat for Humanity ReStores in Deschutes County accept many materials for reuse.

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