Recycling keeps materials that would have ended up in the garbage back into the manufacturing loop, requiring less energy and raw materials to be used. For example, by recycling one aluminum can, 95% of the energy used to make a new can is saved, all by throwing it in a recycling bin.

 

How it Works

Recycling in driven by a combination of state and local laws working with local recycling markets and programs. So if you look at what happens to your old paper and soda cans after you move them to the curb, you’ll find that they get baled up and trucked over the mountains along with other commingled recyclables in Central Oregon, and end up at a Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) where they are sorted mechanically and by hand. From there, old paper or cans are sold to markets where they will get recycled into new products.

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